Provera

Provera

$150,00

Provera replaces the progesterone hormone when your body is not producing enough of it. Provera is a registered trademark of Pfizer.

Provera is used to treat conditions such as absent or irregular menstrual periods, or abnormal uterine bleeding. Provera is also used to decrease the risk of endometrial hyperplasia (a condition that may lead to uterine cancer) while taking estrogens. Provera is also used to prevent overgrowth in the lining of the uterus in postmenopausal women who are receiving estrogen hormone replacement therapy. Provera may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Provera is a type of female hormone (progestin). This medication is similar to the progesterone that your body naturally makes and is given to replace the hormone when your body is not making enough of it. This medication has several uses. In women who are not pregnant and not going through menopause, this medication is used to treat abnormal bleeding from the uterus and to restore normal menstrual periods in women who have stopped having them for several months (amenorrhea). Provera is also used as part of combination hormone replacement therapy with estrogens to reduce menopause symptoms (e.g., hot flashes). Provera is added to estrogen replacement therapy to reduce the risk of cancer of the uterus. This medication must not be used to test for pregnancy.

Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this drug and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor. Follow the dosing schedule carefully. Ask your doctor if you have any questions. The dosage is based on your medical condition and response to therapy. For use in combination hormone replacement therapy with estrogens, take this medication usually once daily for the prescribed number of days each month as directed. For the treatment of stopped menstrual periods (amenorrhea) and abnormal bleeding from the uterus, take this drug usually once daily for 5-10 days during the second half of the planned menstrual cycle or as directed by your doctor. Withdrawal bleeding usually occurs within 3-7 days after you stop taking the medication. Inform your doctor if your condition does not improve or if it worsens.
Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any of these serious side effects: sudden numbness or weakness, especially on one side of the body; sudden headache, confusion, problems with vision, speech, or balance; chest pain, sudden cough, wheezing, rapid breathing, fast heart rate; pain or swelling in one or both legs; chest pain or heavy feeling, pain spreading to the arm or shoulder, nausea, sweating, general ill feeling; vaginal bleeding if you have already gone through menopause; feeling like you might pass out; a breast lump; symptoms of depression (sleep problems, dizziness, mood changes, headache); fever; jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes); or swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet. Less serious side effects may include: spotting or breakthrough bleeding; changes in your menstrual periods; vaginal itching or discharge; breast tenderness or discharge; mild itching or skin rash; increased acne, hair growth, loss of scalp hair; sleep problems (insomnia); changes in appetite or weight, mild stomach pain, bloating, nausea; or skin color changes. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.
Addition Of A Progestin When A Woman Has Not Had A Hysterectomy Studies of the addition of a progestin for 10 or more days of a cycle of estrogen administration, or daily with estrogen in a continuous regimen, have reported a lowered incidence of endometrial hyperplasia than would be induced by estrogen treatment alone. Endometrial hyperplasia may be a precursor to endometrial cancer. There are, however, possible risks that may be associated with the use of progestins with estrogens compared to estrogen-alone regimens. These include an increased risk of breast cancer. Unexpected Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding In cases of unexpected abnormal vaginal bleeding, adequate diagnostic measures are indicated. Elevated Blood Pressure Blood pressure should be monitored at regular intervals with estrogen plus progestin therapy. Hypertriglyceridemia In women with pre-existing hypertriglyceridemia, estrogen plus progestin therapy may be associated with elevations of plasma triglycerides leading to pancreatitis. Consider discontinuation of treatment if pancreatitis occurs. Hepatic Impairment and/or Past History Of Cholestatic Jaundice Estrogens plus progestins may be poorly metabolized in women with impaired liver function. For women with a history of cholestatic jaundice associated with past estrogen use or with pregnancy, caution should be exercised, and in the case of recurrence, medication should be discontinued. Fluid Retention Progestins may cause some degree of fluid retention. Women who have conditions which might be influenced by this factor, such as cardiac or renal impairment, warrant careful observation when estrogen plus progestin are prescribed. Hypocalcemia Estrogen plus progestin therapy should be used with caution in women with hypoparathyroidism as estrogen-induced hypocalcemia may occur. Exacerbation of Other Conditions Estrogen plus progestin therapy may cause an exacerbation of asthma, diabetes mellitus, epilepsy, migraine, porphyria, systemic lupus erythematosus, and hepatic hemangiomas and should be used with caution in women with these conditions.
Drug-Laboratory Test Interactions The following laboratory results may be altered by the use of estrogen plus progestin therapy: Accelerated prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and platelet aggregation time; increased platelet count; increased factors II, VII antigen, VIII antigen, VIII coagulant activity, IX, X, XII, VII-X complex, II-VII-X complex, and betathromboglobulin; decreased levels of anti-factor Xa and antithrombin III, decreased antithrombin III activity; increased levels of fibrinogen and fibrinogen activity; increased plasminogen antigen and activity. Increased thyroid-binding globulin (TBG) levels leading to increased circulating total thyroid hormone levels as measured by protein-bound iodine (PBI), T4 levels (by column or by radioimmunoassay) or T3 levels by radioimmunoassay, T3 resin uptake is decreased, reflecting the elevated TBG. Free T4 and free T3 concentrations are unaltered. Women on thyroid replacement therapy may require higher doses of thyroid hormone. Other binding proteins may be elevated in serum, for example, corticosteroid binding globulin (CBG), sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) leading to increased circulating corticosteroid and sex steroids, respectively. Free hormone concentrations, such as testosterone and estradiol, may be decreased. Other plasma proteins may be increased (angiotensinogen/renin substrate, alpha-1-antitrypsin, ceruloplasmin). Increased plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) and HDL2 cholesterol subfraction concentrations, reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentration, increased triglycerides levels. Impaired glucose tolerance.